DC WishBook
CHECK IN DATE:
NUMBER OF NIGHTS:
For Phone Reservations Call 800-422-8644
Fort Stevens, located at 13th and Quackenbos St. NW, was one of many forts built to fortify DC during the Civil War. In 1864, it was the site of a battle where President Lincoln briefly came under fire.
Fort Stevens, located at 13th and Quackenbos St. NW, was one of many forts built to fortify DC during the Civil War. In 1864, it was the site of a battle where President Lincoln briefly came under fire.
 

Food & Drink from the Civil War to the Civil Rights Era

Eat and drink your way through locations in DC that played a part in the Civil War or civil rights.

  • PRINT

The importance of the epicurean cannot be overlooked in history. From the famed Greensboro Lunch Counter that helped spark the civil rights movement to bars that serve what Civil War-era soldiers drank, these top 10 spots demonstrate the history of dining.

  1. Willard InterContinental: Chat up the bar manager for inside tips on former presidents and their favorite drinks, and enjoy the Mint Juleps that Henry Clay brought to DC. Peek in the hotel’s history gallery to see Lincoln’s bill (he stayed at the Willard before his inauguration).
  2. Greensboro lunch counter: While you can’t eat there today, the lunch counter made famous by civil rights era sit-ins is part of the collection on display at the National Museum of American History.
  3. Bourbon: Sample an abundant collection of the spirits enjoyed by soldiers during the war at this DC bar with two locations—north of Georgetown and in Adams Morgan.
  4. National Archives: You can research historic recipes in the Archives’ vast holdings (and located on the former site of DC’s Central Market).
  5. Old Ebbitt Grill: Although the exact location and décor of this classic eatery have changed over time, the Old Ebbitt is DC’s oldest restaurant. It opened in 1856.
  6. Busboys & Poets: This bookstore-meets-coffee shop, with two downtown locations and others in the suburbs, takes its name from a Langston Hughes poem.
  7. Library of Congress: You’ll find plenty of historic cookbooks in the Library’s extensive collections.
  8. Decatur House: The Lafayette Square residence’s slave quarters have been restored to show how slaves during the war era lived, worked and cooked.
  9. Wok and Roll: You’d never guess from the outside that this Chinatown eatery is housed in Mary Surratt’s boarding house.
  10. Ben’s Chili Bowl: A local institution, Ben’s weathered the riots of the 1960s and the tumultuous 1970s and remains a must-try for locals and visitors.
Collecting, preserving and displaying the heritage of the United States, the National Museum of American History boasts some of the Smithsonian's most beloved objects, including President Lincoln's top hat and Dorothy's ruby slippers.
Collecting, preserving and displaying the heritage of the United States, the National Museum of American History boasts some of the Smithsonian's most beloved objects, including President Lincoln's top hat and Dorothy's ruby slippers.
1 of 4