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50+ Things to Do This February in Washington, DC

Kick off the new year with exciting events, exhibits, concerts, plays and much more.

Make plans for unforgettable experiences in the nation's capital this February. In addition to the events, February is a perfect time to experience the city's Black history and culture, as well as reacquaint yourself  with the most romantic aspects of the city. After you’ve read through this list, make sure to check out our things to do for the week and weekend and read why DC is the best city to visit in 2022.

Travel Status Update: According to the DC government, masks are required indoors through at least Feb. 28, 2022 for all people, regardless of vaccination status. Learn more.

Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial on the National Mall - Monument in Washington, DC

Celebrate Black History Month in the Nation's Capital
Black history and culture are an essential part of DC’s identity, which means that there are numerous ways to celebrate Black History Month in the city. We’ve detailed some of the best ways to engage with DC’s Black culture and community, from experiencing iconic landmarks to frequenting black-owned businesses to visiting the National Museum of African American History and Culture on the National Mall.
 

Washington Auto Show – Through Jan. 30
One of the nation’s largest auto shows calls DC home, and the 2022 edition marks a return to an in-person celebration. Car lovers will be dazzled by hundreds of vehicles from top manufacturers. Grab your tickets and make sure to review the show's health and safety protocols as you plan your visit.
TicketsCOVID Safety Information
Walter E. Washington Convention Center, 801 Mount Vernon Place NW, Washington, DC 20001

 

Philadanco! – Jan. 28
Also known as The Philadelphia Dance Company, this troupe is renowned for its superbly trained dancers and electrifying performances. The company is celebrating 50 years as one of the trendsetters of modern dance with this performance at Strathmore. Expect to see iconic works and new choreography that speaks to the most pressing cultural issues of our times. Also, BaKari Lindsay will showcase new pieces that highlight Caribbean and African heritage through Malian kora music.
8 p.m. |  Tickets
Strathmore, 5301 Tuckerman Lane, North Bethesda, MD 20852
 

Last Podcast on the Left: Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again Tour – Jan. 28
One of the country’s most popular podcasts dives into horror on their new tour that will touch down at The Anthem in late January. Hosts Ben Kissel, Marcus Parks and Henry Zebrowski will cover a range of dark topics, from Jeffrey Dahmer to werewolves to Jonestown to iconic hauntings. Enjoy some laughs as the crew fully immerses themselves in the dark side of humanity.
8 p.m. |  Tickets
The Anthem, 901 Wharf Street SW, Washington, DC 20024

 

Tig Notaro – Jan. 28
Beloved stand-up comedian and founder of DC’s Bentzen Ball Comedy Festival comes equipped with her special brand of humor to DC’s Warner Theatre. Tig Notaro’s talents don’t stop on stage – she’s also had success as a writer, actress and radio contributor. From fighting through breast cancer to the challenges of motherhood, Notaro has kept audiences laughing through it all. Don’t miss your chance to catch one of this generation’s most insightful comics.
7 p.m. |  Tickets
Warner Theatre, 513 13th Street NW, Washington, DC 20004

 

The Simon & Garfunkel Story – Jan. 29-30
One of the most iconic duos in the history of popular music receives elaborate musical tribute at The National Theatre this January. The concert-style show depicts the journey of Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel to superstardom and their eventual split in 1970. The shows climaxes with their famous reunion concert in Central Park in 1981. A full live band will perform hits like “Mrs. Robinson,” “Cecilia” and “Bridge Over Troubled Water”.
Tickets
National Theatre, 1321 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20004
 

Monster Jam – Jan. 29-30
Do you get amped watching 12,000-pound trucks slam, jam, bump and throttle their way around a dirt track? ATVs and speedsters also get into the action at this one-of-a-kind event that will call Capital One Arena home for two days.
Tickets
Capital One Arena, 601 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20004

 

Nick Mason’s Saucerful of Secrets – Jan. 30
If you’ve enjoyed the spaced-out psychedelic prog rock of Pink Floyd, then you’ve enjoyed the drumming of the masterful Nick Mason. The English musician is now touring with his own band, Saucerful of Secrets (named after Pink Floyd’s second LP, released in 1968). Set the controls for the heart of the Anthem for what promises to be a spectacular stage show led by a rock legend.
8 p.m. | Tickets
The Anthem, 901 Wharf Street SW, Washington, DC 20024

 

The New Woman Behind the Camera – Through Jan. 30, 2022
The National Gallery of Art displays breathtaking photographs from more than 120 women photographers around the world. These "new women" embraced the art form as a mode of personal and professional expression and in the process, rewrote the rules of modern photography. See unflinching and beautiful images from these trailblazers who embodied a creative and confident spirit and whose work showed unique new perspectives from the 1920s to the 1950s. Make sure to read up on even more reasons to check out The New Woman Behind the Camera.
Open 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. daily |  Free admission |  Safety guidelines
National Gallery of Art, 6th Street & Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC
 

Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater – Feb. 1-6
The preeminent modern dance company returns to the Kennedy Center with a program that celebrates the company’s illustrious history and aims to bring audiences together in joy. The production will feature some of Ailey’s most famous compositions, including Revelations, as well as new works. Get ready to be united by the power of dance.
Tickets
The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, 2700 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20566

 

Daphne’s Dive – Feb. 1 – March 20
Signature Theatre Company in Arlington, Va. turns into Daphne’s Dive this February. Written by Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Quiara Alegría Hudes, the play concerns a north Philly bar (run by the titular character) that becomes homebase for outsiders, including an eccentric activist, a businessman, a retired biker, an abandoned teenager, an offbeat artist and even Daphne’s sister. Across 20 years, you will observe this vivacious group drink, dance, rejoice and grieve together in a stirring tribute to family and hospitality.
Tickets
Signature Theatre, 4200 Campbell Avenue, Arlington, VA 22206

 

The War on Drugs – Feb. 2
With a signature sound (and a great name), The War on Drugs have become one of rock music’s most revered acts. Combining the reflective Americana of Springsteen with ambient guitars and krautrock-inspired rhythms, the group crafts adventures in the form of song, great for listening while you watch the sun set or during a cruise down the highway. Their powerful live show will touch down at The Anthem this February.
8 p.m. |  Tickets
The Anthem, 901 Wharf Street SW, Washington, DC 20024
 

Courtney Barnett – Feb. 2-3
Courtney Barnett is a rock and roll treasure, with songs that address elevator operators, awkward encounters at swimming pools, trouble breathing and lots more, all with striking wit and wordplay, not to mention a fantastic backing band. Shamir, another wholly idiosyncratic artist in the indie sphere, will open this highly anticipated set of shows at 9:30 Club.
Tickets
9:30 Club, 815 V Street NW, Washington, DC 20001
 

Dear Mapel – Feb. 2-13
Written and performed by Psalmayene 24, a prominent local voice in hip hop theater and Mosaic’s Andrew W. Mellon playwright-in-residence, this joyful, coming-of-age story will take audiences from Park Slope, Brooklyn to Washington, DC. Psalm’s adolescence and life milestones are often accentuated by the absence of his father, Mapel. In a series of letters, both imagined and real, you will come to understand the power of the written word and how it can connect us to our family, our past and our future.
Tickets
Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H Street NE, Washington, DC 20002

 

CUT by Wolfgang Puck

CUT by Wolfgang Puck

Celebrate Lunar New Year at CUT by Wolfgang Puck – Feb. 3
Chef Andrew Skala welcomes Chef Scott Drewno, Chef Danny Lee, Chef Mei Lin (a Top Chef winner) and Chef Tetsu Yahagi into the kitchen for a three-course, family-style dinner at CUT by Wolfgang Puck, located inside Rosewood Washington, D.C. The experience will include a dim sum-inspired first course and shareable main course, abundant sides and dessert. The menu will highlight classic Asian-inspired dishes and ingredients reimagined through the lens of modern American fine dining. Think scallion pull-apart bread served with whipped toasted chili butter, Maine lobster and black truffle cheung fun or wagyu beef and duck liver bao.
5-9 p.m. |  Reserve
CUT by Wolfgang Puck, 1050 31st Street NW, Washington, DC 20007

 

Kacey Musgraves – Feb. 3
With multiple Grammy Awards and no. 1 country albums to her name, Kacey Musgraves has packed a lifetime of accomplishments into the first stage of her career. Her star power will shine bright during this show at Capital One Arena, the city's largest music venue. Musgraves’ distinct take on country and soaring voice will dazzle what is likely to be a sold-out crowd.
8 p.m. |  Tickets
Capital One Arena, 601 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20004
 

Smithsonian American Art Museum’s Virtual Lunar New Year Celebration – Feb. 5
The Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM) honors the Lunar New Year with this free, virtual celebration presented in partnership with the Embassy of the People's Republic of China in the United States of America. Enjoy streamed video performances of dances, acrobatics and yo-yo tricks by the Madison Chinese Dance Academy as well as demonstrations of traditional Chinese crafting and Lunar New Year traditions, including the classic "lion dance". Be sure to explore even more activities on SAAM’s Lunar New Year Family Zone.
More info

 

The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

The REACH Winter Lanterns – Through Feb. 6
The Kennedy Center welcomes you and your entire family to this stunning on-site display of Winter Lanterns at The REACH. Approximately 100 of these lanterns will be illuminated on the grounds, showcasing the incredible work of Chinese artists. In total, the lanterns are made up of 10,000 colored LED lights.
More info
John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, 2700 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20566

 

Washed Out – Feb. 9
Ernest Greene, who performs under the moniker “Washed Out,” is a continually evolving artist. His first release, Life of Leisure (you may recognize “Feel It All Around”, which opened IFC’s Portlandia) drew notice for its endearing take on “chillwave,” a genre that seemingly existed for one summer. No worries for Greene. Since then, he has expanded into synth pop and rock, deftly combining those styles, as well as hip-hop and free jazz, to create a timeless sound that can only be recognized as his own.
7 p.m. |  Tickets
9:30 Club, 815 V Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

 

Swan Lake – Feb. 9-13
The Washington Ballet’s take on Swan Lake will reveal the tragic love story of Prince Siegfried and a swan princess, a dizzying tale full of magic and suspense. Audiences will be treated to beautiful costume designs, jaw-dropping sets and staging and choreography that will take your breath away. Witness the DC’s favorite company in top form in one of the most famous ballets of all-time.
Tickets
The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, 2700 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20566
 

Fran Lebowitz – Feb. 11
Through essays and interviews across several decades, Fran Lebowitz’s acerbic wit and daring insights have captivated readers and TV audiences. The New York City-based humorist has been the subject of a Martin Scorsese documentary, topped Bestseller lists and lent her wry commentary to shows hosted by Conan O’Brien, Jimmy Fallon and many more. The Kennedy Center will host one of our greatest social commentators for one night only.
8 p.m. |  Tickets
The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, 2700 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20566

 

50 Years of Broadway at the Kennedy Center – Feb. 11-12
The Kennedy Center has hosted numerous Broadway smashes across its 50 years, including pre-Broadway engagements and thrilling revivals. Across two nights, DC’s legendary cultural center will celebrate some of the greatest moments in Broadway history with a collection of stage stars you are unlikely to see in one place again, including Stephanie J. Block, Alfie Boe, Sierra Boggess, Gavin Creel, Christopher Jackson, LaChanze, Beth Leavel, Norm Lewis, Andrea McArdle, Andrew Rannells and many more. Tony Award winner James Monroe Iglehart will host this once-in-a-lifetime event.
7:30 p.m. (both nights) |  Tickets
The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, 2700 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20566

 

National Building Museum: An Architectural Photography Workshop – Feb. 13
David Luria leads this workshop in exterior and interior architectural photography that will use the incredible National Building Museum as its subject. Luria will guide you through photographing the National Law Enforcement Memorial outdoors before heading inside to capture scenes of the museum’s breathtaking interior, which includes faux-marble columns, an atrium and other impressive design features. Your fee for the workshop includes full admission to the museum and all of its exhibits.
1:30-4 p.m. |  Book
National Building Museum, 401 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20001
 

Celebrate Valentine’s Day in DC – Feb. 14
The nation’s capital shines as a romantic destination with the best date ideas, from its award-winning dining scene and outstanding attractions to its scenic monuments. Your options for an unforgettable excursion are plentiful – go budget-friendly, amp up the romance, go off the beaten path or get adventurous. Regardless of how you go about it, you can have a spectacular date night in DC.
 

Shen Yun – Feb. 15-20
China was once known as the Middle Kingdom, and Shen Yun will bring this ancient world to life through dance, an orchestra and incredible backdrops. All these elements come together to reveal 5,000 years of awe-inspiring Chinese stories and history. Discover new dimensions, powerful heritage and historical wisdom in this jaw-dropping performance.
Tickets
The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, 2700 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20566

 

National Geographic Museum Reopening – Feb. 16
After being closed for nearly two years, the National Geographic Museum will reopen this February. Free registration will be offered through the end of the month, with pre-registration for tickets available on the museum’s website. Two new exhibitions will welcome you back: Once Upon a Climb: Stories of Everest and The Greatest Wildlife Photographs.
Hours, Admission & Safety Protocols
National Geographic Museum, 1145 17th Street NW, Washington, DC 20036

 

Mortified – Feb. 17
Adults will share embarrassing childhood artifacts in order to tell fascinating life stories in this one-night-only production at the Kennedy Center. The comic exposition of teenaged possessions and creations – including journals, letters, poems, home movies and more – will cover an array of hilarious topics, from awkward first kisses to life at Bible camp and Jon Bon Jovi obsessions.
7:30 p.m. |  Tickets
The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, 2700 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20566
 

Die Antwoord – Feb. 17
South African hip-hop sensation Die Antwoord approaches the genre unlike any other act. The co-ed group’s bombastic songs, presence and outfits mean their live shows are explosions of sound, color, intensity and plenty of dancing. The Anthem will host this truly unique group for one night only in February.
8 p.m. |  Tickets
The Anthem, 901 Wharf Street SW, Washington, DC 20024

 

Umphrey’s McGee – Feb. 18
One of the country’s most well-traveled and dearly adored bands, Umphrey’s McGee continues to whip up their own special stew of rock, with unpredictable set lists and improvisations that have made them a mainstay in the jam band scene. Don’t think you’re seeing another Phish rip-off, though: Umphrey’s is well-versed in rock history, blending a wide range of influences that includes Frank Zappa, The Beatles and Iron Maiden. Don’t be surprised if you hear a little folk, jazz or bluegrass mixed in too.
8 p.m. |  Tickets
The Anthem, 901 Wharf Street SW, Washington, DC 20024
 

Action Bronson and Earl Sweatshirt – Feb. 19
There are rappers and then there are dudes like Action Bronson and Earl Sweatshirt. Both have distinctive styles, using intricate wordplay and sample-strewn beats that harken back to the soul, house and jazz sounds of the previous century. You may also know Action from his popular show, That’s Delicious or Earl from his days with the Odd Future collective. The Alchemist and Boldy James will also join these two superstars during this can’t-miss concert at The Anthem.
8 p.m. |  Tickets
The Anthem, 901 Wharf Street SW, Washington, DC 20024
 

White Noise – Through Feb. 20
Studio Theatre’s latest production comes from the mind of Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Suzan-Lori Parks. White Noise follows four longtime friends (and sometimes lovers) as they come into their own in the city. Their relationships are disrupted when one of their own is involved in a violent encounter with police. As a result, long-kept secrets are revealed, loyalties are tested and the group wrestles with the difficulties of a “not-at-all post-racial world”.
Tickets
Studio Theatre, 1501 14th Street NW, Washington, DC 20005

 

World Builders – Through Feb. 20
Prologue Theatre brings this innovative character study to the stage at Atlas Performing Arts Center. World Builders concerns Max and Whitney, who are both participating in a clinical trial to treat their schizoid personality disorder. The two must figure out together what the future holds, all while dealing with allowing another person to experience their intimate reality – one that outsiders have always proclaimed as fantasy.
Tickets
Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H Street NE, Washington, DC 20002

 

Alif Ba Exhibition – Through Feb. 21
The National Children's Museum presents this interactive experience, which translates to "ABC Exhibition". Hosted in partnership with the Qatar Foundation, the exhibition introduces young audiences to the Arabic alphabet and language. Kids can explore the 28 letters that make up the Arabic alphabet, listen to the sound of each and practice writing or tracing the language. Special programming is also offered.
Hours, protocols & admission
National Children's Museum, 1300 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20004

 

Aquatint: From Its Origins to Goya – Through Feb. 21
More than 100 exceptional examples of the aquatint technique recently acquired by the National Gallery of Art constitute the first American exhibition to highlight the medium's development across Europe. The artistic range of aquatint led to striking images, including tombs, volcanoes, moonlit vistas and caricatures, from French, British, Italian, German, Dutch and Spanish printmakers in the 18th century.
Open 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. daily |  Free admission |  Safety guidelines
National Gallery of Art, 6th Street & Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC

 

Tool – Feb. 22
Since bursting onto the scene with the prog-rock/heavy metal sounds of Undertow in 1993, Tool has consistently been cited as one of the torch-bearers of heavy rock. Each of their subsequent releases has seen the band try new sounds stylistically, culminating in 2019’s Fear Inoculum, which marked their first major release since 2006. Capital One Arena is the perfect setting for the spectacle that is a Tool show. Buckle up.
7:30 p.m. |  Tickets
Capital One Arena, 601 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20004
 

Sleigh Bells – Feb. 23
Never has a group crystallized the sound of noise-pop better than Sleigh Bells. Combining the raucous guitars of Derek E. Miller, singalong choruses, head-spinning samples, visceral drum slams and the vocals of Alexis Krauss, the duo create a cacophony that will have 9:30 Club in a dance-crazed daze. Now well into their second decade of rocking out, the two-person band will bring a riveting show that's unabashedly loud.
7 p.m. |  Tickets
9:30 Club, 815 V Street NW, Washington, DC 20001
 

John Mayer – Feb. 23
Now synonymous with guitar wizardry, John Mayer will bring his immense talent and long list of hits to the Capital One Arena as part of his Sob Rock tour this February. Fans should be clamoring for a DC stop from the acclaimed singer/songwriter, as he hasn’t performed in the District since 2017. Expect a mix of favorites and new tunes from the adventurous musician.
7:30 p.m. |  Tickets
Capital One Arena, 601 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20004
 

alt-J and Portugal. The Man – Feb. 27
The Anthem hosts two of indie rock’s most popular bands on one night. Portugal. The Man were prolific during the late 2000s and early 2010s, putting out an acclaimed album nearly every year. Their sound draws on pop and electronic music as much as it does rock, creating songs and albums with dynamic range. Darlings of the British musical press since their first release, alt. J approach rock/pop music with a blend of guitars, samplers, synths, drums and layered vocals to create songs that work as immersive experiences. Their live show is a spectacle featuring a colorful light display that blends perfectly with their complex compositions. Sir Chloe will join the festivities during what promises to be an epic show inside one of the city’s most popular music venues.
7 p.m. |  Tickets
The Anthem, 901 Wharf Street SW, Washington, DC 20024
 

Trans Am – Through Feb. 26
Keegan Theatre hosts this new one-woman autobiography that features the music of Lisa Jackson & Girl Friday, a cult favorite in New York City. Through stories and songs, the audience will be immersed in the experience of Lisa Stephen Friday. Trans Am shares Lisa’s trans journey, one that reflects the common human desire for self-actualization while hilariously calling out the world’s strange obsession with other-ness.
Tickets
Keegan Theatre, 1742 Church Street NW, Washington, DC 20036

 

Transient: Impermanent Paintings – Through March 6
This groundbreaking exhibition, originally composed as a live performance, presents a series of audiovisual paintings created by the artist in concert with generative algorithms. The exhibition employs technology as a lens to explore music for the 21st century audience and rethink the traditional techniques in the context of human-machine relationship. Projected on a large scale, hyper-realistic digital brushstrokes unfold like on canvas. Each brushstroke corresponds to a note, creating polyphonic synthetic landscapes. The same algorithms driving the hyper-realistic digital brushstrokes also materialize in the sound of piano via Yamaha Disklavier, experienced through 24-channel L-Acoustics L-ISA Immersive Hyperreal Sound technology.
Monday – Thursday: 12-8 p.m. |  Friday – Sunday: 10 a.m. – 10 p.m. |  Tickets
Safety guidelines
ARTECHOUSE, 1238 Maryland Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20024
 

Change Agent – Through March 6
Arena Stage showcases this play from Tony Award-nominated playwright and director Craig Lucas. During the volatile 1960s, one woman influenced American policy – and in turn, world events – through her friendships and proximity to power. Change Agent imagines captivating scenes between unsung influencers of one of the most important decades in American history. See how these voices impacted major decisions that still have an impact in our country today.
Tickets
Arena Stage, 1101 6th Street SW, Washington, DC 20024
 

New Glass Now – Through March 6
The Renwick Gallery showcases the creativity and dexterity of architects, artists and designers who work in one of the world’s most challenging materials: glass. New Glass Now consists of objects, videos, installations and performances from 50 different artists in 23 countries, allowing visitors to marvel at the tremendous skill of contemporary glass-making.
Wednesday – Sunday, 10 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. |  Free admission |  Safety guidelines
Renwick Gallery, Pennsylvania Avenue at 17th Street NW, Washington, DC 20006

 

 

What A Relief – Through March 18
Organized by The Phillips Collection and Washington Sculptors Group (WSG) and presented at [email protected] free of charge, this exhibit showcases small relief sculptures crafted by artists-members of the WSG from the greater DC region. The centuries-long art practice of relief sculptures has been reimagined by these local creatives. You’ll be able to view 40 works from artists ranging in age from 15 to 81.
More info
THEARC West, 1801 Mississippi Avenue SE, Washington, DC 20020
 

Toyin Ojih Odutola: A Countervailing Theory – Through April 3
The Hirshhorn features this stunning narrative work through next April. Toyin Oljih Odutola's A Countervailing Theory features 40 large-scale monochromatic drawings in low-lit galleries. The series is presented as if each drawing was unearthed at an archaeological site in Nigeria. Panel by panel, these pastels reveal a myth conceived by Odutola, reminding one of a mammoth graphic novel. The installation spans the entirety of the Museum’s circular inner galleries on its second floor.
Wednesday - Sunday, 10 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. |  Free admission |  Safety guidelines
Hirshhorn Museum & Sculpture Garden, Independence Avenue & 7th Street NW, Washington, DC 20560

 

Abigail DeVille: Light of Freedom – Through April 17
The Hirshhorn’s Sculpture Garden hosts this 13-foot-tall, mixed-media installation that serves as a response to the Black Lives Matter movement within the larger context of America’s long relationship to the idea of liberty itself. Sculptor Abigail DeVille is widely recognized for works that mine the overlooked, often traumatic histories of Black America to spotlight cultural contradictions and inequities. The piece’s proximity to the U.S. Capitol Building and the National Mall is not accidental.
Wednesday - Sunday, 10 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. |  Free admission |  Safety guidelines
Hirshhorn Museum & Sculpture Garden, Independence Avenue & 7th Street NW, Washington, DC 20560

 

Sargent, Whistler, and Venetian Glass: American Artists and the Magic of Murano – Through May 8
Discover Venice’s rich history as a glassmaking capital and its influence on early 20th century art with this retrospective at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. The first comprehensive look at the American Grand Tour to Venice in the late 19th century features works by seminal artists such as John Singer Sargent, James McNeill Whistler and many more, all of which convey how glassmakers in Murano inspired new ventures and styles in American painting.
Wednesday – Sunday, 11:30 a.m. – 7 p.m. |  Free admission |  Safety guidelines
Smithsonian American Art Museum, 8th and G Streets NW, Washington, DC 20004

 

Thomas & Friends: Explore the Rails – Through May 15
The National Children’s Museum hosts this special display in Visiting Exhibit Hall. Recommended for kids ages 2-7, Explore the Rails features Thomas and his engine friends at some of the Island of Sodor’s most iconic locations. Kids will be able to solve a variety of challenges, from shape identification to more complicated engineering obstacles. Thomas and his friends will be there to encourage throughout.
Tickets | Thursday through Sunday Mornings: 9:30 am – 12:30 pm. Afternoons: 1:30 – 4:30 pm
1300 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20004

 

Positive Fragmentation: From the Collections of Jordan D. Schnitzer and His Family Foundation – Through May 22
Set to be on display at the American University Museum at the Katzen Arts Center, this exhibit will feature more than 100 works by 21 contemporary women artists who use the concept of fragmentation frequently in their compositions. Expect to observe prints that fragment and reassemble shapes, colors, texts, perspectives, ideas and stereotypes. The exhibit was organized by the National Museum of Women in the Arts.
More info
American University Museum at the Katzen Arts Center, 4400 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20016

 

James Van Der Zee’s Photographs: A Portrait of Harlem – Through May 30
The National Gallery of Art showcases more than 40 images by legendary photographer James Van Der Zee, a prolific chronicler of life in New York City’s Harlem neighborhood during the 1920s, ‘30s and beyond. Van Der Zee captured special occasions and other local happenings through carefully composed photographs that provided insights into the personalities and aspirations of his subjects. He also photographed nightclubs and storefronts as well as religious, social, political and athletic community groups in his signature style. Marvel at a master’s work in this revelatory exhibit.
Open 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. daily |  Free admission |  Safety guidelines
National Gallery of Art, 6th Street & Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC

 

FUTURES – Through July 6
Smithsonian's historic Arts and Industries Building has opened its groundbreaking new experience. On view through July 6, 2022, FUTURES is the Smithsonian’s first major building-wide exploration of the future and temporarily reopens the Smithsonian’s oldest museum for the first time in nearly two decades. The part-exhibition, part-festival celebrates the Smithsonian’s 175th anniversary with more than 150 awe-inspiring objects, ideas, prototypes and installations that fuse art, technology, design and history to help visitors imagine many possible futures on the horizon. Make sure to read our guide to the exhibit before you go. Mark the calendar for the Futures We Dream community weekend, which will feature a talk from Monica O. Montgomery, social justice and programming curator, on community action and storytelling (Jan. 14), a virtual film premiere followed by a Q&A session with the filmmakers (Jan. 15) and a special family day (Jan. 16).
Free admission |  Hours & protocols
Arts and Industries Building, 900 Jefferson Drive SW, Washington, DC 20560

 

Laurie Anderson: The Weather – Through July 31
You're likely familiar with Laurie Anderson and her influence without even knowing it. One of the most groundbreaking artists of the 20th century has used a range of media, including live performance, video, music and writing, to address American identity and technology and the effect of both on human relationships. This exhibit at the Hirshhorn debuts more than 10 new artworks, interspersed with essential Anderson creations from throughout her career. The immersive audiovisual experience will be complimented by a series of live shows by Anderson from January through July.
Wednesday - Sunday, 10 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. |  Free admission |  Safety guidelines
Hirshhorn Museum & Sculpture Garden, Independence Avenue & 7th Street NW, Washington, DC 20560

 

Make Good The Promises: Reclaiming Reconstruction and its Legacies – Through Aug. 31
Step into the National Museum of African American History and Culture's new 4,300-square-foot exhibition that explores the Reconstruction era through an African American lens. Make Good The Promises features 175 objects, 200 photographs, 15 audio, video and interactive programs, as well as a companion book. The exhibition explores the deep divisions and clashing visions about how to rebuild the United States after slavery and the end of the Civil War. It connects that era to efforts in 2021 to make good on the promises of the Constitution.
Wednesday – Sunday: 10 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. |  Free timed passes |  Safety guidelines
Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, 1400 Constitution Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20560

 

The Wall/El Muro: What Is a Border Wall? – Through Nov. 6
The National Building Museum examines the concept of a border wall through the perspective of architecture and design in this exhibit. The ways in which the built environment and the landscape of security challenge us and our notion of America are central themes. Photography, video, artifacts and an immersive design reveal to visitors the role of design and engineering in the realm of national security and geopolitics.
Friday – Sunday, 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. |  Tickets & safety guidelines
National Building Museum, 401 F Street NW, Washington, DC 20001

 

Preston Singletary: Raven and the Box of Daylight – Through Jan. 29, 2023
The National Museum of the American Indian will host this new exhibit that features works from internationally acclaimed artist Preston Singletary and tells the story of Raven, the creator of the world and giver of the stars, moon and sun. The exhibit promises a multisensory experience with storytelling, music, soundscapes and projected images.
Wednesday – Sunday, 10 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. |  Free admission
National Museum of the American Indian, 4th Street & Independence Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20560

 

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