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Free Landmark Lecture: Houses Divided

This Week
October 22, 2019
From: 06:30 PM to 08:00 PM

Arlington House, Tudor Place, and the American Civil War presented by Mark Maloy, National Park Service

Arlington House sits on a bluff overlooking the nation’s capital. Similar to Tudor Place, Arlington was the home of a step-grandchild of George Washington. George Washington Parke Custis, the younger brother of Martha Parke Custis Peter, built Arlington as a memorial to George Washington, in addition to being a residence. The Custises at Arlington were very close to their cousins at Tudor Place. The homes were linked by familial ties and by their mutual guardianship of the Washington family legacy. Both became repositories of some of the most treasured heirlooms that once belonged to George and Martha Washington.

In 1831, young Lieutenant Robert E. Lee married into the storied Custis family when he wed Mary Anna Randolph Custis, the heiress of Arlington House. Lee’s decision in 1861 to resign from the U.S. Army and join the Confederacy became one of the most significant events in American history. Lee refused “to raise my hand against my relatives, my children, my home.” However, members of both the Lee and Custis families would end up on opposite sides of the war. The war would change Arlington forever, as it was seized and changed into the nation’s preeminent burying ground.

Join Mark Maloy as he explores the connections between Tudor Place and Arlington House, the difficult decisions made by family members at both homes as the nation hurtled towards the Civil War, and the ultimate fate of Arlington House. He will also describe the current rehabilitation of the estate, and some of the recent archaeological finds that reinforce Arlington’s long association with George and Martha Washington.

Admission is free/pay what you can, with donations welcome. Doors open at 6 p.m., lecture begins at 6:30 p.m.

Event Location

1644 31st Street, NW,
Washington, DC 20007
Georgetown

Contact

(202) 580-7326 or education () tudorplace ! org

Admission: FREE/Pay what you can

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